How To Choose The Right Cookware For You

At Cookwareconfidential, you know we like to keep things as easy as possible. Here’s our no-frills guide to help you choose the best cookware for you.

Stainless Steel Cookware

Stainless Steel Cookware

The most popular type of cookware on the market, stainless steel is durable, non-reactive, and relatively affordable. While stainless steel’s heat conductivity leave much to be desired, the best stainless steel cookware sets get around this by layering aluminum or copper in between the stainless steel interiors and exteriors.

 

Copper Cookware 

Copper Cookware

This is the fancy stuff, guys! What looks more kitchen chic than gorgeous copper pots and pans hanging from your Williams Sonoma pot rack (above your Viking range, next to your Subzero fridge… you get where we’re going with this, right?). In addition to being super chic and sexy, copper cookware sets are unparalleled heat conductors. This means whether you’re cranking up the heat or cooling it down a notch, copper pots and pans allow for the greatest control of heat distribution. Copper is a reactive metal but modern copper cookware sets get around this by lining the interior with a thin layer of stainless steel. The only con in our eyes, as you may have guessed it, is the price. These guys are pricey but well worth it in our (humble) opinion.

 

Aluminum Cookware

Aluminum Cookware

Super common in the bakeware world, aluminum can be found in a number of sheet pans and baking sheets. It’s a soft metal, often causing baking sheets to warp in the oven or dent at high heats. It is an excellent heat conductor, however, there is a fair bit of controversy about the safety of cooking (and eating) with aluminum, and the sale of aluminum cookware is banned in many European countries.

 

Cast Iron Cookware

Cast Iron Cookware

What’s better than an egg frittata right out of the oven? Maybe good old fashioned corn bread, or crispy, juicy chicken thighs. These are all possible with cast iron cookware. The most durable cookware material on the market, cast iron can last for decades, generations even, with proper care. The cons here are that it takes some time to heat up, and can rust easily without regular seasoning.

 

Non-Stick Cookware

Non-Stick Cookware

Non-stick is good for a lot of reasons, namely, convenience. You won’t be spending hours scrubbing egg residue or other cooked on grime, and non-stick cookware allows you to use less butter or oil, great for those watching their waistlines. However, at higher temps Teflon releases harmful substances known to cause illness in bird and potentially humans and because of this, we reserve our non-stick cookware for eggs, exclusively.

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